chuyên bâng quơ,vớ vẩn về căn bệnh Alzheimer(quên lảng):Một bệnh nhân 56 tuổi quên vợ(đã cưới nhau 12 năm) tán tỉnh vợ và đề nghi mần đám cưới !!!!-chuyện “hấp hôn “thời Covy !!

Husband, 56, with Alzheimer’s who no longer recognises his wife of 12 years proposed to her again after telling her ‘you’re my favourite person’ – and they wed for a second time in an intimate ceremony

  • Peter Marshall, 56, from Connecticut, suffers from early onset Alzheimer’s 
  • First married wife Lisa on 13 August 2009 in beach wedding on Turks and Caicos
  • He lost many of his memories but was sure Lisa remained his ‘favourite person’
  • Proposed for a second time earlier this year after seeing wedding scene on TV 
  • Couple renewed their vows in front of friends and family in April of this year 

By HARRIET JOHNSTON FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 11:23 EDT, 23 June 2021 | UPDATED: 22:17 EDT, 23 June 2021

A man with early onset Alzheimer’s has tied the knot to his wife for a second time after he proposed for a second time because he forgot they were already married.   

Peter Marshall, 56, from Connecticut, first married Lisa on 13 August 2009 in a beach wedding in Turks and Caicos and began suffering from problems with his memory in 2017. 

Despite forgetting most of his memories, he was sure Lisa remained his ‘favourite person’ and proposed to her after seeing a wedding scene on TV earlier this year.

The pair renewed their vows in front of friends and family in April, with Lisa telling NBC News New York: ‘He doesn’t know that I’m his wife. I’m just his favourite person. I’m the luckiest girl in the world. I get to do it twice. It was so perfect. I couldn’t have dreamt for a better day.’Peter Marshall, 56, from Connecticut, who has early onset Alzheimer's has tied the knot to his wife Lisa for a second time after he proposed for a second time because he forgot they were already married+10

Peter Marshall, 56, from Connecticut, who has early onset Alzheimer's has tied the knot to his wife Lisa for a second time after he proposed for a second time because he forgot they were already married

Peter Marshall, 56, from Connecticut, who has early onset Alzheimer’s has tied the knot to his wife Lisa for a second time after he proposed for a second time because he forgot they were already married (left, their first wedding in 2009, and right, their second wedding in April) The pair first married on 13 August 2009 in a beach wedding in Turks and Caicos and began suffering from problems with his memory in 2017+10

The pair first married on 13 August 2009 in a beach wedding in Turks and Caicos and began suffering from problems with his memory in 2017

The pair lived opposite one another in the same neighborhood in  Pennsylvania for years and in 2001 their relationship became romantic after they both divorced. 

After Peter moved to Connecticut for work, they dated long-distance for eight years before deciding to get married in 2009 and live together.   

But in 2017, Peter became increasing forgetful and had difficulties remembering words.

The following year, a neurologist diagnosed him with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. The pair lived opposite one another in the same neighborhood in Pennsylvania for years and in 2001 their relationship became romantic after they both divorced+10

The pair lived opposite one another in the same neighborhood in Pennsylvania for years and in 2001 their relationship became romantic after they both divorced 

Despite his worsening memory, and the fact he regularly forgot Lisa was his wife, she never left his side.

He always remembered she is his ‘favourite person’, because their ‘hearts are connected’.

By 2020, Lisa, who now runs the Facebook blog about their experience, was forced to quit her own job to become a full-time carer.

She told the Washington Post: ‘It’s been devastating, but I’ve done my best to stay positive and focus on one day at a time. My mantra has always been to have no regrets.’ The couple renewed their vows in front of a crowd of friends and family, with Lisa calling the day 'so magical'+10

The couple renewed their vows in front of a crowd of friends and family, with Lisa calling the day ‘so magical’Lisa's daughter, Sarah Brehant, 32, who works as a wedding planner, leapt into action and contacted several vendors, who offered their services for free for the big day+10

Lisa’s daughter, Sarah Brehant, 32, who works as a wedding planner, leapt into action and contacted several vendors, who offered their services for free for the big day

Earlier this year Lisa said she was with Peter when a wedding scene came on TV and he pointed to the screen and said: ‘Let’s do it’. 

She explained: ‘I said, “Do what?” And he pointed to the TV, to the scene of this wedding and I said, “Do you wanna get married?”

‘He said yes and had this huge grin on his face. He doesn’t know that I’m his wife.’

By the next day, Peter had forgotten about the suggestion, but Lisa said the idea stuck with her, revealing: ‘I started thinking, “Maybe we really ought to do this”.’ Lisa said guests were weeping during the wedding, and confessed there 'wasn't a dry eye in the house' when they exchanged vows+10

Lisa said guests were weeping during the wedding, and confessed there ‘wasn’t a dry eye in the house’ when they exchanged vows 

The next day, however, Peter appeared to have forgotten all about it, nor did he have any recollection of their island wedding 

Lisa’s daughter, Sarah Brehant, 32, who works as a wedding planner, leapt into action and contacted several vendors, who offered their services for free for the big day.

The music matched the theme of the day with a saxophonist played Unforgettable as Lisa walked down the aisle to Peter.

The couple then renewed their vows in front of a crowd of friends and family, with Lisa calling the day ‘so magical.’   As they shared a first dance while guests looked on, Lisa said her husband whispered: 'Thank you for staying'+10

As they shared a first dance while guests looked on, Lisa said her husband whispered: ‘Thank you for staying’Since their second wedding, Peter now needs constant supervision and is unable to perform every day tasks like making the bed+10

Since their second wedding, Peter now needs constant supervision and is unable to perform every day tasks like making the bed+10

Since their second wedding, Peter now needs constant supervision and is unable to perform every day tasks like making the bed

As they shared a first dance while guests looked on, Lisa said her husband whispered: ‘Thank you for staying.’ 

She said: ‘There wasn’t a dry eye, and I was over the moon. I hadn’t seen Peter that happy in a long time.’ 

Since their second wedding, Peter now needs constant supervision and is unable to perform every day tasks like making the bed. Meanwhile Lisa has since started a Facebook blog called ‘Oh Hello Alzheimer’s’ to help her cope with the progressive challenge of her husband’s fading memory and said she gets messages ‘every day’ from others in the same position. Alzheimer’s Disease explained: What happens to the brain

WHAT IS DEMENTIA? THE KILLER DISEASE THAT ROBS SUFFERERS OF THEIR MEMORIES

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of neurological disorders

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of neurological disorders

A GLOBAL CONCERN 

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders (those affecting the brain) which impact memory, thinking and behaviour. 

There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer’s disease is the most common.

Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.

Regardless of which type is diagnosed, each person will experience their dementia in their own unique way.

Dementia is a global concern but it is most often seen in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live into very old age.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE AFFECTED?

The Alzheimer’s Society reports there are more than 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK today, of which more than 500,000 have Alzheimer’s.

It is estimated that the number of people living with dementia in the UK by 2025 will rise to over 1 million.

In the US, it’s estimated there are 5.5 million Alzheimer’s sufferers. A similar percentage rise is expected in the coming years.

As a person’s age increases, so does the risk of them developing dementia.

Rates of diagnosis are improving but many people with dementia are thought to still be undiagnosed.

IS THERE A CURE?

Currently there is no cure for dementia.

But new drugs can slow down its progression and the earlier it is spotted the more effective treatments are.

Source: Alzheimer’s Society 

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