Chuyện(dài kỳ thị đen trắng) nước Mỹ :Ông cảnh sát Derek Chauvin(da trắng) bị “bồi thẩm đoàn” kết tội giết “thánh tử đạo”(da đen) George Floyd-ABC…

George Floyd’s voice haunted Derek Chauvin murder trial

“Tell my kids I love them” were Floyd’s final words.ByBill HutchinsonApril 20, 2021, 2:27 PM• 8 min read

Key moments from Derek Chauvin trial
People hold placards after the verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, in front of Hennepin County Government Center, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 20, 2021 [Carlos Barria/Reuters]

Key moments from Derek Chauvin trialThe former Minneapolis police officer was charged with the murder of George Floyd afte…Read More

During the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, jurors heard from 45 witnesses. But legal experts say the voice that may have resonated most in the courtroom every day was one from the grave.

In what legal experts called a rarity for the criminal justice system, George Floyd played a major role in the trial of the man prosecutors allege killed him. Jurors saw and heard Floyd up close, in multiple videos, begging for his life up until his final breath.AdvertisementTop Articles

They gonna kill me. They gonna kill me, man.

The jury in the high-profile case announced on Tuesday afternoon that it had reached a unanimous verdict finding Chauvin guilty on the charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Dr. Ziv Cohen, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at Cornell University, said that what ever decision the jury decides, the videos the panel saw of Floyd’s final moments were “powerful” evidence for the prosecution.

“That video is the star of this trial. It’s the star witness of this trial. It’s the biggest piece of evidence in this trial,” Cohen told ABC News.

In bystander video taken from just feet away from Floyd and the officers who were on top of him during the May 25, 2020, arrest, and in even closer police body camera videos, jurors heard Floyd not just begging for his life but talking about his deceased mother, children and predicting his own demise.

PHOTO: Police officers attempt to remove George Floyd from a vehicle outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis, on May 25, 2020, in an image from police body cam video shown at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, March 31, 2021.
Court TV/Pool via APCourt TV/Pool via APPolice officers attempt to remove George Floyd from a vehicle outside Cup Foods in Min…Read More

“They gonna kill me. They gonna kill me, man,” Floyd is heard saying in the now-famous video taken by a then-17-year-old high school student, Darnella Frazier.

Frazier’s video recording appears to show Chauvin pressing his left knee on the back of Floyd’s neck as he cried out 27 times, “I can’t breathe,” and eventually said, “My neck. I’m through. I’m through.”

“My stomach hurt. My neck hurts. Everything hurts,” Floyd said in the video, his face pushed against the pavement. “Give me some water or something, please.”

As the disturbing footage continues, Floyd refers to Chauvin as “Mr. Officer” and speaks of his family: “Can’t believe this, man. Mom, love you. Love you. Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead.”

In police body camera footage taken earlier in the episode, the handcuffed man tells the officers he is “claustrophobic” and suffers from “anxiety” as he pleads with them not to put him in the back of a cramped police cruiser.

“Can you put me in the front, please?” he asked, the officers attempting to shove him into the backseat, saying, “I’m not a bad guy, man. I’m not a bad guy.”

At one point he even has a conversation with Charles McMillian, 61, a concerned bystander who tried to intervene, asking Floyd to get into the squad car and saying, “You can’t win.”

“I’m not trying to win,” Floyd responded.

PHOTO: Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin during his trial, left, and a family photo of George Floyd, right.
Court TV,Ben Crump LawCourt TV,Ben Crump LawFormer Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin during his trial, left, and a family photo…Read More

When Chauvin and the other officers remove him from the vehicle and start to place him on the ground, Floyd said, “Thank you” and “I’m gonna lie on the ground. I’m going down.”

Cohen said that while many murder trials nowadays are bound to feature some form of video, mostly surveillance video with no audio, the Chauvin trial is unique for the abundance of footage, from multiple angles.

“Certainly hearing George Floyd in distress for a very long period of time, kind of seeing him in his agony and in the final moments of his life, is disturbing to your average viewer and to the jury,” Cohen said. “You clearly see that George Floyd is having fear, anxiety, he’s in pain, his voice is thick, he’s struggling. At various points, he cries out. So, I think the challenge here is that you’re not seeing a placid victim, or a placid decedent, where you might try to convince yourself that he’s not suffering.”

He said Chauvin’s attorney, Eric Nelson, has been attempting to undo the power of those images with “ideas, facts that might muddy the waters in terms of what would appear to be very clear from the video.”

MORE: Police departments across US brace for Derek Chauvin verdict

Brian Buckmire, a New York City public defender and an ABC News legal contributor, said most state courts allow such video, which is considered out-of-court hearsay, to be used at trial under what is called the Dying Declaration Rule.

“We presume that the last words of a person dying are going to be true, because why would you lie if you are about to die?” Buckmire said, explaining the rule. Still, he agreed that such video in a murder trial is “extremely rare.”

“When we see video in homicide cases, it’s usually grainy video from a distance,” Buckmire added. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen this much video of someone’s final moments of life in a criminal prosecution.”

MORE: Key takeaways from the Derek Chauvin murder trial, Day 15

He said the videos used by prosecutors in the case have also been powerful in humanizing Floyd to the point where it’s “almost slightly divine.”

“When you hear someone’s final words, saying, ‘Thank you’ to an officer for taking him out of a car, calling their mother, I think that resonates with a lot of people,” Buckmire added. “I think you hear that and everyone goes to that point and time if they’ve lost someone and the final words of that person.”

MORE: Derek Chauvin murder trial spotlights America’s social ills: Advocates

Not only have the prosecution and defense been allowed to replay the video countless times, but both sides also have been permitted to seize on freeze frames of the footage in arguments over whether Chavin was following his training as a Minneapolis police officer.

Nelson, the defense attorney, even tried countering the prosecution’s case by playing for the jury part of a previous arrest of Floyd in May 2019, to illustrate similarities with the fatal 2020 arrest and to show the effects opioids allegedly had on Floyd.

“You’re not just hearing it second-hand from someone else,” Buckmire said, “which is very rare.”

Jury Finds Chauvin Guilty On All Charges

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin arrives for the verdict in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin arrived for the verdict in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn.

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED  4:21 PM PT – Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all charges in connection with the death of George Floyd.

A jury in Hennepin County convicted Chauvin on Tuesday of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

It took the jury a little over 10 hours of deliberation to reach the verdict after hearing two weeks of testimony from witnesses called by the prosecution and several days of defense witnesses.In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody as his attorney Eric Nelson, left, watches, after his bail was revoked after he was found guilty on all three counts in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was taken into custody as his attorney Eric Nelson, left, watched, after his bail was revoked after he was found guilty on all three counts in his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Chauvin’s bail has been revoked and sentencing will begin in eight weeks.

Để lại lời nhắn

Mời bạn điền thông tin vào ô dưới đây hoặc kích vào một biểu tượng để đăng nhập:

WordPress.com Logo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản WordPress.com Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Google photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Google Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Twitter picture

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Twitter Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Facebook photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Facebook Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.