Dịch Covid Vũ Hán Tại Anh Quốc-The Guardian

UK records largest single-day increase in coronavirus deaths to 1,019

The number of new fatalities rises by 34%, the highest since 18 March when it rose 46%

Aaron Walawalkar

Sat 28 Mar 2020 11.40 EDTFirst published on Sat 28 Mar 2020 11.33 EDT

Police in North Yorkshire enforce the country’s coronavirus lockdown measures
 Police in North Yorkshire enforce the country’s coronavirus lockdown measures. Photograph: Ian Forsyth/Getty Images

The UK has recorded its biggest day-on-day increase in the number of people to die of Covid-19 since the outbreak began, taking the total to 1,019.

Department of Health figures reveal that at 5pm on Friday the toll had increased by 260 from 759 the day before.

The 34% rise is the largest day-on-day percentage increase since 18 March, when the total rose by 46% from 71 to 104.

As of 9am on Saturday, 17,089 people in the UK had tested positive for Covid-19. The total number of people tested stands at 120,776.

NHS England has confirmed that 246 of the deaths were patients aged between 33 and 100. All but 13, who were aged between 63 and 99, had underlying health conditions. The death toll in England now stands at 935.

Four of the most recent deaths were in Wales, seven in Scotland and two in Northern Ireland. This brings the total number of confirmed deaths to 38 in Wales, 40 in Scotland and 15 in Northern Ireland.

It took 13 days for the number of deaths in the UK to go from one to just over 100. It has taken a further 10 days to reach just over 1,000.

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UK can keep Covid-19 deaths below 20,000, says medical director

Professor Stephen Powis has said the national effort can work if everyone plays their part

Toby Helm 

Political editor

Sat 28 Mar 2020 14.06 

The national medical director of NHS England Stephen Powis
 The national medical director of NHS England Stephen Powis answers questions via a video link during a coronavirus media briefing at Downing Street. Photograph: Pippa Fowles/Crown Copyright/10 Downing Street/PA

Every citizen in the United Kingdom must play a part if the number of deaths from coronavirus are to be kept below 20,000, the national medical director has said.

The call for a national effort to reduce deaths came as the total who have died rose by 260 since Friday to 1,019. In total, 17,089 have tested positive in the UK.

At the daily press conference on Covid-19 at Downing Street, Prof Stephen Powis said: “If we can keep deaths below 20,000 we will have done very well in this epidemic.”

Saying it was no time for complacency, he added that the UK could keep within NHS capacity: “If we do ensure we are to stay within the NHS capacity everyone has a part to play … and it can work.”Advertisement

The business secretary, Alok Sharma, said prime minister Johnson continued to show “mild symptoms” and was determined to lead the government “right from the front”. He added: “There are no gaps in the government.”

Sharma announced a range of measures to help companies facing insolvency and having to restructure as a result of the sudden onset of financial pressures. He said changes to insolvency rules would allow firms “greater flexibility as they face the current crisis”.

“It is crucial when the crisis passes, as it will, we are ready to bounce back,” he said, as he detailed measures to help businesses “emerge intact the other side of the Covid-19 pandemic”.

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“These measures will give those firms extra time and space to weather the storm and be ready when the crisis ends whilst ensuring creditors get the best return possible in the circumstances,” he continued.

The new rules will allow companies undergoing restructuring to continue access to supplies and raw materials.

And, he said, there would be a temporary suspension of wrongful trading provisions – which will apply retrospectively from 1 March – for company directors to remove the threat of personal liability during the pandemic.

“However, to be clear, all of the other checks and balances that help to ensure directors fulfil their duties properly will remain in force.”

Suren Thiru, head of economics at the British Chambers of Commerce, said: “Businesses will welcome the government’s sensible steps to amend insolvency laws to help protect companies weakened by the impact of coronavirus. Companies would also be allowed to delay annual general meetings or hold them remotely.

“It is right that the rules on wrongful trading are temporarily suspended to ensure that directors are not penalised for doing all they can to save companies and jobs during this turbulent period.

“Companies that were viable before the outbreak must be supported to ensure they can help power the recovery when the immediate crisis is over.

“Cashflow remains an urgent concern for many businesses, so it’s vital that government support packages reach businesses and people on the ground as soon as possible.”

NHS staff feel like ‘cannon fodder’ over lack of coronavirus protection

Also announced were measures to cut red tape to allow companies to produce personal protective equipment (PPE) and hand sanitiser more quickly. BCC co-executive director Hannah Essex said: “Businesses across the UK will welcome measures that help them contribute to the national effort to tackle coronavirus. Action to speed up the production of these supplies will be vital in limiting the spread of the virus and reducing the burden on our health service.

“Chambers and their members are working together to see how they can play their part, including gathering unused PPE equipment from local businesses and delivering it to the NHS.”Play Video2:10 How do I know if I have coronavirus and what happens next? – video explainer

When the virus becomes political…

… journalism that is rooted in empirical data and science matters. It may even save lives. This administration has cleared out science and scientists across all departments. Donald Trump’s daily coronavirus press briefings have become political rallies. He frequently spreads, at best, misinformation and, at worst, lies. But the Guardian is working tirelessly to filter out misinformation and separate fact from fiction.

Unlike many news organisations, all of our reporting is free and available for everyone – during this time of crisis and beyond. This is made possible thanks to the support we receive from readers like you across America in all 50 states.

The need for a robust, independent press has never been greater, and with your support we can continue to provide fact-based reporting that offers public scrutiny and gives people the tools to make decisions about their lives, health and security. You’ve read more than 6 articles in the last four months.

Our journalism relies on our readers’ generosity – your financial support has meant we can keep investigating, disentangling and interrogating. It has protected our independence, which has never been so critical. We are so grateful.

We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support the Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.

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