Vành đai – Con đường: Điều gì xảy ra khi con nợ dân chủ hơn chủ nợ?/Why Democracies Are Turning Against Belt and Road ?

              FOREIGN AFFAIRES MAGAZINE

Why Democracies Are Turning Against Belt and Road

Corruption, Debt, and Backlash

By Christopher Balding

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), an enormous international investment project touted by Chinese President Xi Jinping, was supposed to establish Chinese soft power. Since late 2013, Beijing has poured nearly $700 billion worth of Chinese money into more than sixty countries (according to research by RWR Advisory), much of it in the form of large-scale infrastructure projects and loans to governments that would otherwise struggle to pay for them. The idea was to draw these countries closer to Beijing while boosting Chinese soft power abroad.

Today, however, China faces a backlash to BRI at home and abroad. Many Chinese complain of the initiative’s wasteful spending. Internationally, some of the backlash is geopolitical, as countries grow wary of Beijing’s growing influence. But much of it is simply political. Unlike Western lenders, China does not require its partners to meet stringent conditions related to corruption, human rights, or financial sustainability. This no-strings approach to investment has fueled corruption while allowing governments to burden their countries with unpayable debts. And citizens of many BRI countries have reacted with anger toward China—an anger that is now making itself felt in elections. Far from expanding Chinese soft power, the BRI appears to be achieving the opposite.

THE BACKLASH TO BRI

Malaysia’s election in May 2018 crystallized the sorts of concerns about Chinese power that have been building within BRI client countries. Mahathir Mohamad defeated the incumbent Prime Minister,Najib Razak by openly campaigning against Chinese influence. He criticized Razak for approving expensive BRI infrastructure projects that required considerable borrowing from China, which Razak used to create an illusion of development while he and his associates plundered state coffers. Since taking office in May, Mohamad has cancelled two of the largest Chinese projects in Malaysia—a $20 billion railroad and a $2.3 billion natural gas pipeline—citing his country’s inability to pay.

The backlash has not been limited to Malaysia. Pakistan has received an estimated $62 billion in Chinese lending order to finance projects, including highway and rail infrastructure and

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), an enormous international investment project touted by Chinese President Xi Jinping, was supposed to establish Chinese soft power. Since late 2013, Beijing has poured nearly $700 billion worth of Chinese money into more than sixty countries (according to research by RWR Advisory), much of it in the form of large-scale infrastructure projects and loans to governments that would otherwise struggle to pay for them. The idea was to draw these countries closer to Beijing while boosting Chinese soft power abroad.

Today, however, China faces a backlash to BRI at home and abroad. Many Chinese complain of the initiative’s wasteful spending. Internationally, some of the backlash is geopolitical, as countries grow wary of Beijing’s growing influence. But much of it is simply political. Unlike Western lenders, China does not require its partners to meet stringent conditions related to corruption, human rights, or financial sustainability. This no-strings approach to investment has fueled corruption while allowing governments to burden their countries with unpayable debts. And citizens of many BRI countries have reacted with anger toward China—an anger that is now making itself felt in elections. Far from expanding Chinese soft power, the BRI appears to be achieving the opposite.

THE BACKLASH TO BRI

Malaysia’s election in May 2018 crystallized the sorts of concerns about Chinese power that have been building within BRI client countries. Mahathir Mohamad defeated the incumbent Prime Minister,Najib Razak by openly campaigning against Chinese influence. He criticized Razak for approving expensive BRI infrastructure projects that required considerable borrowing from China, which Razak used to create an illusion of development while he and his associates plundered state coffers. Since taking office in May, Mohamad has cancelled two of the largest Chinese projects in Malaysia—a $20 billion railroad and a $2.3 billion natural gas pipeline—citing his country’s inability to pay.

The backlash has not been limited to Malaysia. Pakistan has received an estimated $62 billion in Chinese lending order to finance projects, including highway and rail infrastructure and a port in Gwadar, and has been bailed out by Chinese banks on multiple occasions. Pakistan’s growing inability to service its international debt, which has ballooned thanks to Chinese lending, has prompted some anti-BRI sentiment in the country—although this avoided becoming a major campaign issue during Pakistani elections in July. The new government of the populist Prime Minister Imran Khan has not followed Malaysia in breaking economic ties with China, but it is evaluating all options for repaying its debt, including potentially suspending or delaying repayment. Thanks to its BRI debt, Pakistan is now planning to enter negotiations with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a bailout, despite Khan’s initial opposition to doing so. 

The Maldives, too, has recently brought heavier scrutiny to BRI projects. In September, voters ousted the country’s strongman president, Abdulla Yameen, in favor of the democratic reformer Ibrahim Solih. Solih’s election has brought a reevaluation of Yameen’s heavy borrowing from China, which many worried had abetted official corruption and would leave the country effectively under the control of Beijing. Solih has vowed to revisit some of the Maldives’ BRI projects, and although he is unlikely to back out of major Chinese deals totaling $1.3 billion—including a mile-long bridge to the airport in the capital, Male—he is clearly reassessing his country’s ties with Beijing.

Even where governments are not being thrown out of office, they have become warier of BRI lending. In August, Kenya began cracking downon corruption related to the Chinese-built railroad connecting Nairobi and Mombasa, arresting local officials who had used the project to line their pockets. Other countries, such as Uganda and Zambia, are starting to worry as well. In June, the Zambian think tank scholar Trevor Simumba warned that Zambia’s borrowing from China was rapidly becoming unsustainable and expressed concern about the “severe lack of transparency over many key terms” in the loans. These countries are beginning to worry not just about the costs of BRI projects, such as Uganda’s recent highway expansion—in which governments borrow Chinese money to pay Chinese companies to build infrastructure at above-market prices—but about the sustainability of their country’s debt loads and the supposed beneficence of Chinese investment.

WHAT WENT WRONG?

How did China’s big soft power investment end up alienating the very countries it was supposed to help?

One reason is that countries have become wiser to the financial terms associated with BRI. In the early stages of the initiative, many countries perceived Chinese capital as free—or least low-cost—money. In reality, China often lent above market rates from concessional lenders, such as the World Bank, that had slowed lending because of their concerns about rising debt levels. In Pakistan, official interest rates (as set by the central bank) are upward of five percent on debt while some BRI projects are guaranteed returns of at least 30 percent.

BRI countries have also become concerned about how China behaves as an investment partner. In 2017, Sri Lanka turned granted the Chinese a 99-year lease on one of its ports in order to avoid defaulting on its BRI loans. Since then, countries have worried about the possible ramifications of failing to repay Beijing. They have also become frustrated with the lack of due diligence on the part of local governments and with China’s heavy-handed insistence on single-bid contracts, which force countries to partner with Chinese firms, and sovereign guarantees, which shift risk onto partner countries rather than Chinese firms.

One of BRI’s primary weaknesses was its early selling point: China’s famed no-strings approach to partner governments. Developing countries had long griped about the difficulty of getting projects approved and funded by major Western lenders—including the IMF, the World Bank, and bilateral development agencies like USAID—due to safeguards such as financial sustainability requirements, environmental assessment reports, and anticorruption controls. BRI offered a way around these requirements. But the requirements existed for a reason: Western donor agencies had attached them over time, based on experience, in order to lower the risk of failure.

By contrast, China’s refusal to require reasonable safeguards for its BRI projects has nourished authoritarianism, corruption, debt, and the pursuit of economically unsustainable or nonviable projects. As strong evidence has emerged of corruption in major investment projects, citizens in BRI countries have come to see China as both benefitting from and facilitating this corruption. In countries where there is at least some democratic oversight of government, such as Kenya, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Zambia, voters are holding leaders responsible. Governments that remain in power are more carefully scrutinizing projects, fees, and total debt levels. In other words, with Chinese lenders unwilling to demand accountability, voters are doing it for them.

LEARNING TO LOVE DEMOCRACY

International backlash is not the only problem for BRI. Within China itself, there has been increased grumbling about the largesse lavished upon BRI countries. With Beijing touting the billions of dollars it is spending abroad, many Chinese are asking why that money is not being used to address domestic issues, such health care, housing, and education. Data indicate that Chinese banks investing abroad are generally borrowing U.S. dollars internationally rather than drawing from official foreign exchange reserves, but Chinese critics can be forgiven for not understanding the finer points of global capital markets when their government publicizes China’s large overseas spending and investment.

Intellectuals, such as the Tsinghua University law professor Xu Xangrun, have also raised concerns about the perception that Beijing is promoting foreign aid ambition at the expense of domestic spending. Others, such as the political scientist Zheng Yongnian, have warned that the rhetoric around BRI is likely to make other countries fear that China is seeking hegemony. Still other Chinese analysts have criticized the lack of local standards covering everything from financial sustainability to environmental impact. Given the controlled media, it is possible that some of this public criticism of Xi’s signature foreign policy initiative may be a shadow critique of Xi himself. Ironically, the program intended to promote Chinese soft power is prompting an unprecedented level of domestic and international concern.

Although Chinese leaders have given some thought to how they might improve the perceptions of BRI in partner countries, there is little evidence that they grasp the financial and political realities driving the backlash. Lending in U.S. dollars forces the recipient countries to run dollar surpluses in order to repay Chinese loans, but many countries lack the capacity to run such surpluses. Many of the investments are long-term infrastructure projects, which can take years to complete and require Chinese banks to roll over debt, but Beijing has demonstrated that it expects to be repaid on time or will take punitive measures, as it did in Sri Lanka. Finally, many BRI countries operate under government systems that allow citizens to voice their displeasure, whether through the press or the ballot box. Unused to democratic oversight and criticism, China is struggling to sell its soft power initiative in places where it cannot simply hide embarrassing or inconvenient details.

Since the beginning of BRI, Beijing has preferred to view criticism as nothing more than Western refusal to accept China’s rise. Today, however, the concerns are coming not from the West but from Africa and Asia, where governments are desperate to head off soaring debt problems and the wrath of their people. If Beijing seeks to export the Chinese model or burnish its reputation in the world, it will have to learn to work with democracies, whether it likes them or not.

Vành đai – Con đường: Điều gì xảy ra khi con nợ dân chủ hơn chủ nợ?

NGUYỄN QUỐC TẤN TRUNG

Luatkhoa

Chủ tịch Trung Quốc Tập Cận Bình đang phải học cách đối phó với các con nợ là các quốc gia dân chủ. Ảnh: Xinhua. 251SHARESShareTweet

Sáng kiến Vành đai và Con đường (Belt and Road Initiative – BRI) là một dự án đầu tư khổng lồ được Chủ tịch Trung Quốc Tập Cận Bình thúc đẩy, với kỳ vọng sẽ tạo dựng được quyền lực mềm cho quốc gia này. Từ cuối những năm 2013, Bắc Kinh đã rót gần 700 tỷ USD ngân sách vào hơn 60 quốc gia, mà đại đa số trong số đó là những dự án hạ tầng khổng lồ cùng những khoản vay hậu hĩnh ban đầu cho đến khi các chính phủ nhận ra họ đều đang “há miệng mắc quai”. Mục tiêu, cuối cùng, có vẻ chỉ là kéo những quốc gia này lại gần Bắc Kinh hơn trong khi vẫn gia tăng được quyền lực mềm Trung Hoa trên thế giới.

Nhưng điều bất ngờ là Trung Quốc hiện đang phải đối mặt với những phản ứng tiêu cực từ cả trong và ngoài nước đối với đại dự án Vành đai – Con đường. Một bộ phận người Trung Quốc bắt đầu phàn nàn rằng nó chỉ phí phạm tiền của quốc gia. Mặt khác, trên trường quốc tế, các yếu tố địa chính trị khiến càng ngày càng nhiều quốc gia dè chừng ảnh hưởng ngày càng gia tăng của Trung Quốc.

Khác với những chủ nợ phương Tây – vốn yêu cầu bên vay phải đáp ứng những tiêu chuẩn nghiêm ngặt về kiểm soát tham nhũng, về bảo vệ nhân quyền hay kiểm soát thu chi ngân sách để hướng tới tài chính bền vững – Trung Quốc hầu như không đòi hỏi gì cả. Chính sách đầu tư “không ràng buộc” này châm thêm dầu vào ngọn lửa tham nhũng ở nhiều quốc gia, trong khi cho phép những chính phủ này vung tay quá trán với những khoản nợ họ biết rằng mình không thể trả.

Công dân của rất nhiều quốc gia nhận nợ vay đang thể hiện sự tức giận của mình đối với Trung Quốc bằng nhiều cách, và có thể cảm nhận được cơn giận dữ đó trong các cuộc bầu cử gần đây. Thay vì mở rộng quyền lực mềm Trung Quốc, Vành đai và Con đường dường như đang làm những điều hoàn toàn ngược lại.

Cuộc bầu cử ở Malaysia tháng 5 năm 2018 là một minh chứng không thể rõ ràng hơn về sự hoài nghi nói chung dành cho quyền lực mềm Trung Quốc. Cựu Thủ tướng Mahathir Mohamad chiến thắng trước đương kiêm Thủ tướng Najib Razak với một chiến dịch phản đối một cách trực diện ảnh hưởng của Trung Quốc trên quốc gia này. Ông Mahathir khẳng định Thủ tướng Najib đang cố tình chấp thuận những dự án hạ tầng đắt đỏ thuộc BRI để tạo nên một ảo giác tăng trưởng cho dân chúng, trong khi tiếp tục tham ô ngân sách quốc gia vào túi riêng của mình. Nói là làm, ngay sau khi nhậm chức, ông Mahathir đã hủy bỏ thỏa thuận đối với hai dự án lớn nhất của Trung Quốc ở Malaysia – với 20 tỷ USD cho hệ thống đường sắt và 2,3 tỷ USD cho đường ống dẫn dầu, khí – với lý do đất nước ông không có khả năng để trả khoản nợ này trong tương lai.

Thủ tướng Malaysia Mahathir Mohamad (trái) tỏ ra rất cứng rắn với các dự án Vành đai – Con đường của Trung Quốc. Ảnh: The Star.

Nhưng câu chuyện không dừng lại ở đó. Pakistan đã nhận hơn 62 tỷ USD từ Trung Quốc cho các dự án tương tự như đường cao tốc, đường sắt và cảng Gwadar. Quốc gia này thường xuyên được các ngân hàng Trung Quốc bảo lãnh và giải cứu. Sự hào phóng chính trị này dẫn đến bong bóng nợ công Pakistan đạt tới mức gần như không thể kiểm soát, cùng sự trỗi dậy của các nhóm chống BRI nói riêng và chống Trung Quốc nói chung.

Tháng 7 năm nay, chính phủ mới của Thủ tướng Imran Khan, dù không theo phương pháp quyết liệt như của Malaysia, cũng buộc phải cân nhắc lại toàn bộ các phương án trả nợ vay cho Bắc Kinh, bao gồm cả khả năng đơn phương dừng hoặc kéo dài kỳ hạn trả nợ. Và cũng trớ trêu là vì mắc nợ Trung Quốc mà nay Pakistan đang lên kế hoạch đàm phán với Tổ chức Tiền tệ Quốc tế nhằm cấp cứu thanh khoản cho nước này khỏi các khoản nợ vay Trung Quốc, điều mà chính Thủ tướng Khan ban đầu cũng không muốn làm.

Quốc đảo Maldives đến gần đây cũng đang chịu nhiều áp lực phải kiểm tra, giám sát lại các dự án BRI. Chỉ trong tháng 9 vừa qua, cử tri đã loại vị tổng thống võ biền Abdulla Yameen và chọn nhà cải cách dân chủ Ibrahim Solih. Chiến thắng này tạo cơ hội cho các nhóm chuyên gia đánh giá lại chính sách vay nợ Trung Quốc một cách không kiểm soát dưới thời cựu Tổng thống Yameen, vốn được cho là sẽ dẫn đến tham nhũng và lệ thuộc vào Trung Quốc. Tân Tổng thống Solih đã thể hiện rõ quan điểm rằng ông sẽ phải thẩm tra lại tất cả những dự án BRI hiện hành. Dù có vẻ là Maldives không thể cắt đứt những thoả thuận lớn trị giá tới 1,3 tỷ USD với Trung Quốc, trong đó có cả công trình cầu nối sân bay Maldives đến thủ đô nước này, Tổng thống Solih rõ ràng đang đánh giá lại mối quan hệ của nước ông với Bắc Kinh.

Ngay cả khi vài chính phủ may mắn sống sót qua khỏi làn sóng “bài BRI” trong các cuộc bầu cử quốc gia cũng trở nên lo ngại hơn với các khoản vay từ Trung Quốc.

Tháng 8 vừa qua, Kenya bắt đầu chiến dịch bố ráp tham nhũng liên quan đến các dự án BRIs do nhà thầu Trung Quốc xây dựng kết nối hai tỉnh Nairobi và Mombasa. Nhiều quan chức địa phương bị bắt. Một số quốc gia khác, như Uganda hay Zambia, cũng bắt đầu lo lắng.

Vào tháng 6, một học giả người Zambia, ông Trevor Simumba, đã lên tiếng cảnh báo chính phủ nước ông rằng các khoản vay mà Zambia nhận từ Trung Quốc đang dần trở nên không bền vững, mặt khác có quá nhiều điều khoản không rõ ràng, thiếu minh bạch liên quan đến những vấn đề mấu chốt trong hợp đồng vay nợ. Chính phủ Uganda thì bị chỉ trích vì vay nợ Trung Quốc nhưng lại phải thuê lại các công ty Trung Quốc thực hiện dự án với mức vượt quá giá thị trường, trong khi lợi ích mà họ được nhận từ những dự án này thì không hiện hữu một cách rõ ràng.

Tham vọng Vành đai – Con đường của Trung Quốc. Ảnh: Bloomberg.

Chuyện gì đã xảy ra?

Làm sao vụ đầu tư đắt giá để giành được quyền lực mềm của Trung Quốc lại khiến Trung Quốc lạc lõng với chính những quốc gia mà Vành đai và Con đường giúp đỡ?

Một lý do rõ ràng nhất là các quốc gia đã trở nên thông minh hơn khi tiếp cận các điều khoản đính kèm trong BRI.

Ở buổi bình minh của BRI, nhiều người tin rằng tiền từ Trung Quốc sẽ là miễn phí, hoặc chí ít là có phí thấp nhất. Nhưng thực tế, những khoản vay này có giá cao hơn rất nhiều so với các khoản vay phát triển từ các tổ chức thế giới như Ngân hàng Thế giới. Đối với Pakistan, mức lãi suất quốc gia chính thức được ngân hàng trung ương nước này xác định chỉ khoảng 5%, trong khi nhiều khoản vay Trung Quốc bị bắt buộc bảo đảm lãi suất không dưới 30%.

Nhiều quốc nằm trong Vành đai và Con đường cũng ngờ vực cách hành xử của Trung Quốc như là một đối tác đầu tư. Năm 2017, Sri Lanka đã chấp thuận cho Trung Quốc thuê 99 năm một trong những cảng đáng giá nhất của mình để tránh vi phạm các khoản nợ thuộc BRI. Từ đó, nhiều quốc gia bắt đầu lo lắng về viễn cảnh không trả được nợ cho Bắc Kinh, cũng như lo ngại về tính thiếu chuyên nghiệp của chính phủ nước sở tại khi thực hiện đánh giá tác động và sự áp đặt một chiều hầu hết những hợp đồng vay phải đính kèm với việc sử dụng nhà thầu Trung Quốc, với bất lợi bị đẩy hết cho quốc gia nhận khoản vay.

Một điểm yếu chí tử khác của các khoản vay BRI, cũng chính là ưu điểm khiến BRI “cháy hàng” trước đó: Bắc Kinh không đòi hỏi hay yêu cầu cải cách, minh bạch gì từ quốc gia nước nhận.

Các quốc gia đang phát triển thường khó vay tiền từ các định chế tài chính phương Tây như Tổ chức Tiền tệ Quốc tế (IMF), Ngân hàng Thế giới (WB), hay kể cả Cơ quan Phát triển Quốc tế Hoa Kỳ (USAID). Các điều khoản đảm bảo như phát triển bền vững, báo cáo tác động môi trường và cơ chế kiểm soát tham nhũng có thể khiến việc nhận hỗ trợ tài chính rất khó khăn, nhưng nó cũng làm giảm rủi ro thất bại cho các dự án này.

Ngược lại, việc Trung Quốc từ bỏ những hàng rào kiểm soát nói trên khiến đồng tiền Trung Quốc tại những quốc gia tiếp nhận lại dẫn đến tham nhũng, độc tài, nợ công, lạm phát, các dự án thiếu hiệu quả kinh tế và không khả thi, v.v.

Công dân ở nhiều quốc gia đang xem Bắc Kinh vừa là thủ phạm, vừa là người hưởng lợi từ tình trạng tham nhũng tại quốc gia họ. Tại những quốc gia có ít nhất một số cơ chế kiểm soát dân chủ như Kenya, Malaysia, Pakistan và Zambia, cử tri đang bắt các lãnh đạo của họ phải chịu trách nhiệm. Các chính phủ may mắn tại vị thì bắt đầu cẩn trọng hơn với các dự án BRI, kiểm tra và đánh giá các dự án, chi phí, mức tổng nợ kỹ càng hơn.

Nếu chủ nợ Trung Quốc muốn không đòi hỏi quốc gia vay nợ phải có trách nhiệm giải trình, cử tri của những quốc gia đó đang làm việc này thay cho họ.

Nền dân chủ Maldives đã đưa Ibrahim Solih lên làm tổng thống, và đây là tin không vui với Bắc Kinh. Ảnh: DNA India.

Học cách yêu dân chủ

Những phản ứng quốc tế không phải là vấn đề duy nhất mà Vành đai – Con đường phải đối mặt. Ngay bên trong Trung Quốc, càng ngày càng nhiều người phàn nàn về kiểu chi tiền hào phóng dành cho các quốc gia thuộc nhóm Vành đai và Con đường. Khi mà Bắc Kinh tiếp tục chào hàng và quảng bá việc chính phủ đang chi tiêu hàng tỷ USD ở nước ngoài, người dân Trung Quốc đang bắt đầu tự hỏi vì sao số tiền này không được sử dụng để giải quyết các vấn đề trong nước như chăm sóc sức khỏe cộng đồng, nhà ở hay giáo dục.

Thật ra, các ngân hàng Trung Quốc đang phải chạy vạy khắp nơi để vay tiền USD cho các dự án BRI, họ không sử dụng dự trữ ngoại tệ quốc gia cho các hoạt động này. Nhưng không thể trách giới phê bình Trung Quốc không hiểu được những yếu tố phức tạp của thị trường vốn toàn cầu khi mà chính phủ nước này cứ tiếp tục đăng tải những thông tin hào nhoáng về các khoản đầu tư ra nước ngoài như thế.

Giới trí thức, như Giáo sư Xu Xangrun của Đại học Luật Thanh Hoa (Tsinghua) tại Trung Quốc, cũng thể hiện sự dè dặt của mình về cách mà Trung Quốc một mặt thúc đẩy tham vọng chi viện trợ ra nước ngoài, mặt khác đánh đổi việc chi tiêu cho các vấn đề trong nước. Số khác như nhà khoa học chính trị Zheng Yongnian thì cảnh báo lối khoa trương thiếu căn cứ xung quanh các dự án BRI sẽ chỉ khiến nhiều quốc gia tin rằng Trung Quốc đang ôm mộng bá quyền. Nhiều nhà phân tích khác thì chỉ trích việc các quốc gia tiếp nhận vốn không có được những tiêu chuẩn căn bản từ tài chính bền vững cho đến tác động môi trường.

Trong bối cảnh hệ thống truyền thông bị kiểm soát chặt chẽ tại Trung Quốc, nhiều người có thể cho rằng những lời phản đối công khai dành cho chính sách và sáng kiến ngoại giao của Tập Cận Bình thật ra chỉ là Chủ tịch Tập đang tự phê phán chính mình mà thôi. Dù sau chăng nữa, chính sách được dự định tăng cường quyền lực mềm Trung Hoa lại dẫn đến mức độ quan ngại cả trong và ngoài nước chưa từng có cho thấy ông Tập rõ ràng không dự trù trước được việc này.

Dù các lãnh đạo Trung Quốc đang đưa ra nhiều quan điểm nhằm cải thiện cái nhìn của các quốc gia đối tác trong chương trình BRI, không có bằng chứng cho thấy họ đang kiểm soát được thực tế tài chính và chính trị trong làn sóng phản đối Vành đai và Con đường. Việc cho vay bằng đồng USD khiến các quốc gia vay nợ buộc phải kiểm soát và tăng cường thặng dư USD, nhưng rõ ràng không phải quốc gia nào cũng đủ năng lực kiểm soát cán cân ngoại tệ. Hầu hết các dự án của BRI đều là các dự án hạ tầng dài hạn, mất nhiều năm để hoàn thành với nhiều lần các ngân hàng Trung Quốc sẽ phải chuyển nợ, đáo nợ. Nhưng Bắc Kinh đã tỏ rõ thái độ hoặc thu tiền đúng hạn, hoặc sử dụng các biện pháp chế tài như họ đã áp dụng tại Sri Lanka.

Điểm cuối cùng là rất nhiều quốc gia thuộc sáng kiến Vành đai và Con đường có mô hình nhà nước cấp tiến, cho phép công dân biểu đạt sự không hài lòng của mình, dù bằng báo chí hay con đường bầu cử. Không quen với hoạt động giám sát và phê bình dân chủ, Trung Quốc đang gặp rất nhiều khó khăn trong việc chào mời món hàng quyền lực mềm Trung Hoa.

Trong thời kỳ bình minh của Vành đai và Con đường, Bắc Kinh bao giờ cũng xem những luận điểm phê bình và chỉ trích dành cho sáng kiến này là việc phương Tây phủ nhận sự trỗi dậy của Trung Quốc, không hơn không kém. Nhưng cho đến nay, mối quan ngại và sự phản đối không đến từ phương Tây, mà từ các quốc gia Châu Phi và Châu Á, nơi mà chính phủ đang tuyệt vọng tìm cách kiểm soát mức nợ tăng cao cùng với những cơn thịnh nộ của công chúng. Nếu thật sự muốn xuất khẩu “mô hình” Trung Hoa, hay chí ít là đánh bóng tên tuổi của mình trên trường quốc tế, Bắc Kinh sẽ phải học làm quen với dân chủ, dù họ có thích nó hay không.

Để lại lời nhắn

Mời bạn điền thông tin vào ô dưới đây hoặc kích vào một biểu tượng để đăng nhập:

WordPress.com Logo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản WordPress.com Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Google+ photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Google+ Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Twitter picture

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Twitter Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Facebook photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Facebook Đăng xuất /  Thay đổi )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.